Charles Dance Wears Coloured Contact Lenses Playing a Satan Like Alien

by Greg Fisher 5. January 2016 13:35

Charles Dance Wears Coloured Contact Lenses Playing a Satan Like AlienIn the new Syfy miniseries, Childhood’s End, Charles Dance is really difficult to recognise under heavy make-up, prosthetic elements and with coloured contact lenses covering his irises.

The series is based on a novel written by Arthur C. Clarke and features an alien race looking like many of us imagine the devil does, with horns, leathery skin, creepy eyes and a pointy tail. Charles Dance plays the leader of the aliens and makes a huge impression on the viewers every time he appears on the screen.

According to Matthew Graham, Arthur C. Clarke’s idea was that the aliens’ appearance was something that our subconscious responded to. Interviewed recently, Graham also revealed that Dance had to spend five hours each day in the make-up room, listening to some heavy rock music and patiently waiting for the crew to finish their job transforming him into a Satan look-alike.

Interestingly, it was the coloured contact lenses that caused the most problems for the famous actor. After about an hour they simply became uncomfortable and Dance needed to take them out for a while. The devilish effect they provided, however, was definitely worth the pain.

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Coloured Contact Lenses Appeal to Fashionistas

Coloured Contact Lenses Appeal to Fashionistas

by Tim Fletcher 19. January 2016 12:00

Coloured Contact Lenses Appeal to FashionistasIn recent years, the popularity of coloured contact lenses has risen significantly. At first, they were mostly worn by youngsters who wanted to spice up their Halloween costumes. Now, however, they are a hit among fashionistas, who use them just like any other accessory, an expert has noted in Optician Online.

According to Bill Harvey, the trend started several years ago and seems quite stable. More and more fashion-conscious individuals decide to give coloured contact lenses a try, choosing various brands and shades to match their outfits.

Unfortunately, some of them, the expert points out, still suffer from lens-related complications. These are mostly associated with poor compliance with lens wear and care instructions, inadequate insertion and removal skills (due to the fact that coloured contact lenses are often used by inexperienced wearers) and lower oxygen permeability offered by coloured contacts (in comparison with regular lenses).

To ensure that the rate of complications decreases, Dr Harvey emphasised, practitioners need to make more effort to educate all people interested in wearing cosmetic contact lenses and fit them with the latest products, which provide more oxygen to the cornea.

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