Hypo-osmotic Eye Drops May Improve Contact Lens Comfort

by Joel Harrison 5. 二月 2014 14:01

Hypo-osmotic Eye Drops May Improve Contact Lens Comfort

Improving contact lens comfort, especially when lens wear is associated with dry eye symptoms, is one of the most important issues that lens manufacturers and pharmaceutical companies as well as independent researchers have worked on for decades. A recently published report suggests that it could be, at least partially, solved with the use of hypo-osmotic saline eye drops.

Investigators from the Vision Cooperative Research Centre in Sydney, Australia, conducted a study evaluating the role of hypo-osmotic saline drops in lens comfort. They enrolled fifteen patients with contact lens discomfort issues, who subsequently wore AIR OPTIX NIGHT & DAY contact lenses for 6 hours, taking either hypo- or hyper-osmotic saline drops four times a day. The patients' symptoms and tear film parameters were assessed several times a day to check if the drops had a significant impact on them.

Hypo-osmotic saline drops improved the symptoms in about sixty per cent of the patients, decreasing dryness and lens awareness. However, the drops did not seem to affect tear film parameters.

The researchers concluded that hypo-osmotic saline eye drops can improve contact lens comfort in patients, but more research is needed to make definite recommendations.

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Correcting Astigmatism with Contact Lenses

Correcting Astigmatism with Contact Lenses

by Tim Fletcher 26. July 2013 12:38

Correcting Astigmatism with Contact Lenses

Astigmatism is a refractive error that is not as common as myopia, but it affects a large number of patients who need special types of contact lenses or glasses. It occurs when the cornea is not spherical, but toric, as a result of which the image on the retina is unclear.
The condition is fairly easy to correct with glasses, but it used to cause some problems when contact lenses were used. This was associated with difficulties achieving appropriate stability (important because of the irregularity of the astigmatic cornea).

Fortunately, modern designs have eliminated the issue and, wearing contacts, astigmatic patients can enjoy the same acuity of vision as myopes. In addition, astigmatics have a number of excellent options to choose from – including various types of materials (rigid gas permeable, hydrogel, silicone hydrogel ones), modalities (from daily disposable contact lenses to monthly ones) and sizes (standard, mini-scleral, scleral).

Patients with common types of astigmatism can be fitted with contact lenses immediately. Those with more complicated cases might have to wait for lenses adjusted to their refractive errors, but the ultimate results are virtually identical.

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